Wednesday, September 17, 2064

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The Toshiko Trio

Discovered by Oscar Peterson during a Jazz at the Philharmonic tour of Japan, Toshiko Akiyoshi's first recording in the U.S. didn't take place until 1954, though she recorded in Japan for Norman Granz's Norgran label prior to this trio session. Joined by drummer Ed Thigpen, and the young bassist Paul Chambers, the 24-year-old pianist is already an impressive player. This date for George Wein's Storyville label focuses mostly on her originals, which include the dreamy ballad "Kyo-Shu (Nostalgia)," and the intricate bop vehicle "Homework." The two standards include a Bud Powell-influenced arrangement of "Softly, as in a Morning Sunrise," and a superb, lush "It Could Happen to You." Long out of print, this highly recommended LP was reissued on vinyl by both Black Lion in Europe and Trio in Japan during the 1970s, but it evidently has not yet appeared on CD.
Ken Dryden

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-toshiko-trio-mw0000898966

Toshiko Akiyoshi
The Toshiko Trio

Tracks

1 Between Me and Myself (Akiyoshi)  5:19
2 It Could Happen To You (Burke, VanHeusen)  4:04
3 Kyo-Shu (Akiyoshi)  3:45
4 Homework (Akiyoshi)  3:42
5 Manhattan Address (Akiyoshi)  2:48
6 Sunday Afternoon (Akiyoshi)  4:22
7 Blues For Toshiko (Akiyoshi)  5:19
8 Soshu No Yoru (Japanese)  1:47
9 Softly As In a Morning Sunrise (Akiyoshi)  4:07

*

Personnel
Toshiko Akiyoshi - p
Paul Chambers - p
Edmund Thigpen - dr

Recorded 1956

Paul Moer Trio

A fine pianist, Paul Moer never gained a big name for himself and has long ago slipped into obscurity. Moer graduated from the University of Miami in 1951. He played with many West Coast musicians during the 1950's including Benny Carter, Vido Musso, Zoot Sims, Stan Getz, Bill Holman and Shorty Rogers. Moer worked in the studios (both as a pianist and as an arranger), toured Australia with Benny Carter in 1960, appeared on a few titles with Charles Mingus, recorded with Jack Montrose and John Graas, and cut a trio album in the late 1950's for Del Fi with bassist Jimmy Bond and drummer Frank Butler. He worked with Paul Horn (1960-63), Ruth Price and Buddy DeFranco but then little was heard of the pianist until he made a trio set for Fresh Sound in the 1990's of Elmo Hope tunes.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:difexqtgldse

The Contemporary
Jazz Classics of the 
Paul Moer
Trio
[1959]

Tracks

1 Azure Blues (Moer)  2:23
2 I Love Paris (Porter)  2:50
3 Cutie (Moer)  4:17
4 Short Politician (Moer)  2:32
5 To a Folk Song (Moer)  5:54
6 Moer or Less (Moer)  3:48
7 Mary Ann (Moer)  4:19
8 We'll Be Together Again (Fischer, Laine)  3:05
9 Our Waltz (Moer)  3:26
10 Untiled Melody (Moer)  5:03

*

Personnel
Paul Moer - p
Jimmy Bond - b
Frank Butler - dr

Recorded in 1959
_______
One of pianist Paul Moer's rare sessions as a leader (a date so obscure as to not even be listed in some discographies), this CD reissue from the Del Fi label features Moer in a trio with bassist Jimmy Bond and drummer Frank Butler. Best-known for his brief association with Charles Mingus, Moer plays quite well on ten songs, the majority of which are his compositions. Based on this thoughtful straightahead set alone, Paul Moer deserved much more recognition than he received.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:kzfuxqyhldse

Django Reinhardt 1948 - Intégrale, vol. 16

Many recordings were made in 1947 - a few for disc (Swing, Decca, Blue Star) and many for the national radio. At the end of November, the guitarist teamed up once more with Stéphane Grappelli who had returned to his homeland for a concert in the Salle Pleyel and for two sessions organised by the radio show, Surprise-Partie. Many of these November titles starring the legenday string quintet were broadcast on 27 December, and others were programmed for January and February 1948. Ten of them closed volume 15 (Frémeaux FA 315) ; the remaining four open the present volume - the old Crazy Rhythm (already cut ten years previously with Coleman Hawkins), the delicate Manoir de mes Rêves (with the violin replacing the clarinet for the first time), the forever adorable Daphné (dedicated to Stéph's equally adorable English girlfriend), the curious Danse Nuptiale (alias Moppin' the Bride), based on the theme of Mendelssohn's Bridal March with swingning/bopping flavours. To top it all, an incomplete version of Tiger Rag was cut, no doubt on the same day as the beginning of the following year. However, it is unsure whether it was recorded on 21 or 28 November as all info concerning these two sessions are somewhat hazy.
But the year is not quite out...
Adapted by Laure WRIGHT from the French text of Daniel NEVERS
© FRÉMEAUX & ASSOCIES, 2002


Django Reinhardt
"Festival 48"
The Complete Django Reinhardt, vol 16
(1947-1948)

Tracks

Cd. 1

DJANGO REINHARDT & STEPHANE GRAPPELLY ET LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
(RADIO SESSIONS-1947)
1 Daphné (Reinhardt)  4:25
2 Manoir de mes Rêves (Reinhardt)  4:26
3 Danse nuptiale (Moppin’ the Bride) (Reinhardt)  2:33
4 Crazy Rhythm (Caesar, Meyer, Kahn)  2:55
5 Tiger Rag (alt take) (LaRocca) [incomplet]  2:37

REX STEWART QUINTET - WITH DJANGO REINHARDT & HUBERT ROSTAING
(BLUE STAR SESSION - 1947)
6 Night and Day (Porter)  2:51
7 Confessin’ (Neiburg, Dougherty, Reynolds)  2:53

LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
(NICE JAZZ FESTIVAL - RADIO - 1948)
8 Annonce & Swing 42 (Reinhardt)
9 Nuages (Reinhardt)  1:52

LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
(NICE JAZZ FESTIVAL - RADIO - 1948)
10 Mike (micro) (Reinhardt)  2:48
11 Oh ! Lady Be Good (Gershwin)  2:56
12 Festival 48 (Reinhardt)  2:37
13 Fantaisie (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:54
14 Bricktop (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  3:06
15 Just for Fun (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  3:06
16 To Each His Own (Livingstone, Evans) / symphonie (Alstone, Tabet)  3:03

LE QUINTETTE DU HOT CLUB DE FRANCE
(TOUR DE FRANCE 1948 - RADIO)
17 Odette (Viseur)  2:01

“JAZZ PARADE” : HUBERT ROSTAING SEXTETTE, AVEC DJANGO REINHARDT
(CONCERT / RADIO - 1948)
18 Presentation (Baume, Delaunay)  3:00
19 Diminution (diminishing) (Reinhardt)  3:45
20 Festival 48 (Reinhardt)  2:13

*


Cd. 2

DJANGO REINHARDT A BRUXELLES
(CONCERT - 1948)
1 Moppin’ the Bride (Danse nuptiale) (Reinhardt)  2:06
2 Bolero (Reinhardt)  4:08
3 Cadillac Slim (Carter, Webster)  3:00
4 Nuages (Reinhardt)  3:47
5 Improvisation sur une Danse Norvegienne (Grieg)  2:35
6 Festival 48 (Reinhardt)  1:57
7 Minor Swing (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:25
8 Symphonie (Alstone, Tabet)  1:36

DJANGO REINHARDT & STEPHANE GRAPPELLI A ROME
(RADIO SESSIONS - 1948)
9 Over the Rainbow (Arlen, Harburg)  2:41
10 Night and Day (Porter)  3:02
11 Minor Blues (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  2:43
12 Nature Boy (Ahbez, Palex, Hennevé)  3:32
13 The World is Waiting For the Sunrise (Seitz, Lockhart)  2:43
14 Vous, qui passez sans me voir (Hess, Trénet)  2:49
15 Hallelujah ! (Youmans, Gray, Robin)  3:04
16 Nagasaki (Warren, Dixon)  2:49
17 I’ll Never be the Same (Signorelli, Malneck, Kahn)  3:57
18 Swing 39 (Reinhardt, Grappelli)  3:13
19 Clopin-clopant (Cocatrix, Dudan)  3:04
20 Honeysuckle Rose (Mialler, Razef)  3:59
21 All the Things You Are (Kern, Hammerstein II)  2:50


*

Personnel
Featuring Django Reinhardt, Stéphane Grappelli, Joseph Reinhardt, Eugène Vées, Fred Emerlin, Hubert Rostaing, Ted Curry, "Challun" Ferret, Emmanuel Soudieux, Armand Motta, Jean-Pierre Sasson, Lucien Gallopain, Roby Potevin, Louis Vola, Henri "Louson" Baumgartner, Gianni Safred, Carlo Pecori, Aurelio de Carolis, etc..

Recorded between November 28, 1947 & January & February 1949

Alicia de Larrocha - The First Recordings

A series of reissues on Eloquence (see www.eloquenceclassics.com) has served to remind listeners around the world of the mastery of Alicia de Larrocha in repertoire ranging far beyond her native Spain, from Bach to Rachmaninov (including the Third Concerto with the LSO and André Previn, newly available on 482 0725). However, as Fanfare magazine noted in 1990, "her dominance of Spanish piano music recordings over the last thirty years has put her in the position where her most formidable competition is usually herself".
That dominance began with recordings — Larrocha’s first — made in New York by American Decca during 1954–55. These are now reissued collectively on CD. They include many of the classics of the Spanish piano repertoire : the Danzas Españolas and Goyescas of Granados, Danzas fantásticas of Turina and Danzas de España of Rodrigo principal among them.
In later recordings de Larrocha would go on to refine certain details, but the seamless legato, sparkling fingerwork and unmatched evocation of mood were there from the beginning, as critics were not slow to recognize: when the Goyescas were first issued in October 1955, Gramophone magazine proclaimed that of the five available recordings, ‘honours go to Decca’s Alicia de Larrocha, one with style, technique and colour.’ In August the following year, Lionel Salter observed of the same recordings that "her technique is impeccable and sparkling, and articulation faultlessly clear-cut : Miss Larrocha has abundant vitality and, in El Pelele, clearly, fantasy too".
De Larrocha herself was a reluctant recording artist. ‘The personal sound of the artist becomes lost, and without that, there is nothing,’ she remarked : a testament to the perfectionist temperament recalled in a specially written tribute for the booklet of this release by the pianist’s daughter, Alicia Torra. She goes on to note that of the five composers who appear in this set, her mother personally met four of them: Turina, Esplá, Rodrigo and especially Mompou, with whom she maintained a close friendship. In fact it was her playing of the fifth, Granados, that dazzled early listeners such as the American critic Harold C. Schonberg : "Obviously this music is in the pianist’s blood. She invested it with a degree of life and imagination that not many pianists before the public today could begin to duplicate."
The booklet also includes rare photographs and a manuscript autographed by Turina himself for the little Alicia.

"Miss Larrocha strikes me as one of the very best pianists to have come out of Spain in recent years. She has an impeccably clean technique, considerable strength, verve and temperament, but a level enough head to keep her from exaggerating effects … Her tonal sense and phrasing are exemplary."
Gramophone, December 1955 (Turina)

Source : http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/r/Australian%2BEloquence/ELQ4821546

Alicia de Larrocha
The First Recordings
(1954-1955)

Tracks

Cd. 1

Óscar Esplá
(1886-1976)

Sonata Española, Op. 53
1 I. Andante romantico  6:58
2 II. Mazurka sopra un tema popolare  2:48
3 III. Allegro brioso  5:37

Joaquín Rodrigo
(1902-1999)

Tres Danzas de España
4 I. Rustico 1:32
5 II. Danza de las Tres Doncellas  2:06
6 III. Serrana  1:20

Enrique Granados
(1867-1916)

12 Danzas Españolas
7 N° 1 in G Major (Galante - Minueto)  2:43
8 N° 2 in C Minor (Oriental)  4:28
9 N° 3 in D Major (Fandango - Zarabanda)  3:33
10 N° 4 in G Major (Villanesca)  5:17
11 N° 5 in E Minor (Andaluza)  4:14
12 N° 6 in D Major (Rondalla aragonesa - Jota)  3:38
13 N° 7 in G Major (Valenciana)  4:41
14 N° 8 in C Major (Sardana - Asturiana)  3:31
15 N° 9 in B-Flat Major (Mazurka Romántica)  4:51
16 N° 10 in G Major (Danza Triste - Melancólica)  4:18
17 N° 11 in G Minor (Zambra)  5:10
18 N° 12 in A Minor (Bolero - Arabesca)  5:25

*


Cd. 2

Joaquín Turina
(1882-1949)

Danzas fantásticas, Op. 22
1 I. Exaltación  4:42
2 II. Ensueño  5:47
3 III. Orgía  5:02

Preludios, Op. 80
4 I. Adagio  3:22
5 II. Allegretto  2:00
6 III. Allegro giusto  1:15
7 IV. Allegretto  1:24
8 V. Adagio - Allegro vivo  2:26

Recuerdos de la antiqua España, Op. 48
9 La eterna Carmen  3:13
10 Habanera  3:49
11 Don Juan  4:10
12 Estudiantina  3:10

Partita in C Major, Op. 57
13 I. Preludio  2:38
14 II. Zarabanda  4:22
15 III. Capricho  1:36
16 IV. Introducción y Giga  3:02

Enrique Granados
(1867-1916)

Escenas románticas, H. 57, DLR 5-7
17 I. Mazurka. Poco lento e con abbandono  6:10
18 II. Berceuse. Lento  3:04
19 III. --- (Lento)  5:26
20 IV. Allegretto  1:00
21 V. Allegro appassionato  7:54
22 VI. Epílogo. Andantino spianato  2:23

*


Cd. 3

Enrique Granados
(1867-1916)

Goyescas, o Los majos enamorados
(Part. 1)
1 I. Los requiebros. Allegretto  9:00
2 II. Coloquio en la reja. Andantino allegretto  11:18
3 III. El fandango del candil. Allegretto  5:29
4 IV. Quejas o La maja y el ruiseñor. Andante melancólico  6:47
(Part. 2)
5 V. El amor y la muerte (Balada). Animato e drammatico  13:32
6 VI. Epílogo. Serenata del espectro. Allegretto misterioso  7:59

7 El pelele (Escena goyescas). Andantio quasi allegretto  4:36

Federico Mompou
(1893-1987)

Impressions íntimas
8 I. Planys 1. Lento cantabile espressivo  1:07
9 II. Planys 2. Larghetto  2:00
10 III. Planys 3. Gracioso  1:03
11 IV. Planys 4. Agitato  1:28
12 V. Pájaro triste. Largo  1:39
13 VI. La Barca. Largo  1:39
14 VII. Cuna (Berceuse)  2:48
15 VIII. Secreto. Lento  2:37
16 IX. Gitano. Andante  3:04

*

Alicia de Larrocha - p

Recorded at Pythian Temple, New York ; March 5-15, 1954 ; & April 21-29, 1955

See the complete artwork

Monday, August 21, 2017

Maria Gringerg - Russian Piano School, vol. 14

Maria Grinberg (September 6, 1908–July 14, 1978), was a Soviet pianist. She was born in Odessa, Ukraine, then part of the Russian Empire. Her father was a Hebrew scholar and her mother taught piano privately. Until the age of 18, Maria took piano lessons from Odessa's noted teacher David Aisberg. Eventually she became a pupil of Felix Blumenfeld (who also taught Vladimir Horowitz) and later, after his death, continued her studies with Konstantin Igumnov at the Moscow Conservatory. In 1935, she won the Second Prize at the Second All-Union Pianist Competition.
Grinberg become a major figure of the Russian piano school. However, in 1937 both her husband and her father were arrested and executed as "enemies of the people".[citation needed] The pianist was fired by the state-run management and got a job as an accompanist of an amateur choreography group. During that time, she occasionally participated in concert performances playing timpani. Somehow, she later was readmitted as a piano soloist. She became a much-sought-after pianist in Moscow, with concerts in Leningrad, Riga, Tallinn, Voronezh, Tbilisi, Baku and other cities all over the Soviet Union.
At the age of 50, after Joseph Stalin died, she was finally allowed to travel abroad. In all, Grinberg went on 14 performing tours — 12 times in the Soviet bloc countries and twice in the Netherlands where she became a nationally acclaimed figure. Critics compared her performances with those of Vladimir Horowitz, Arthur Rubinstein, and Clara Haskil.
Only at the age of 55, was she granted her first — and last — honorary title of Distinguished Artist of the Russian Soviet Federation. At 61, she was given a professorship at the Gnessin Institute of Music. Among those on the long list of her pupils are Michael Bischoffberger, Naum Shtarkman and Regina Shamvili.
In 1970, her 13-LP album set featuring all of Beethoven's 32 piano sonatas was released. This was the first time a Russian pianist recorded the complete set of the Beethoven piano sonatas. Three months before the pianist died, in 1978, critic Yudenich called these recordings in the Sovetskaya Muzyka magazine "a true feat of art".
When she was in her late 40s, she noticed that her vision had become significantly worse. She addressed the problem, and it turned out that she had a brain tumor which required surgery. Within a few months, she celebrated her 50th birthday by performing three piano concertos in one evening - Bach's F Minor, Beethoven Third, and Rachmaninoff's Third with Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra.
Maria Grinberg died on the 14 July 1978, in Tallinn, Estonia, ten weeks before her seventieth birthday. The Gnessin Institute's director, chorus master Vladimir Minin (who a year before had forced Grinberg to resign from her teaching position), refused to hold a memorial ceremony on the Institute's premises, and it was only thanks to the efforts of Deputy Minister of Culture Kukharsky, the great pianist was given her last honor in a proper way.

Her sense of humor was legendary. Those who knew her recall a story. Her patronymic [the name of the father, customarily used in Russian names] was Israilyevna (that is, "daughter of Israel", Israel being the first name of her father). In 1967, during the period of heightened tension between the Soviet Union and the State of Israel which the Soviets always addressed as "Israeli aggressors," Grinberg always introduced herself as "Maria Aggressorovna."

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Grinberg

Maria Gringerg
Russian Piano School, vol. 14

Tracks

Carlos Seixas
(1704-1742)

1 Menuet in F Minor  1:58
2 Toccata in F Minor  1:55

Antonio Soler
(1729-1783)

3 Sonata n° 12 in F-Sharp Major. Allegro  2:50
4 Sonata n° 2 in C-Sharp Minor. Allegro moderato  3:10
5 Sonata n° 11 in  G Minor. Allegro  3:14

Domenico Scarlatti
(1685-1757)

6 Sonana in F Minor, K. 69. Allegro moderato  4:41
7 Sonata in A Major, K. 113. Allegro  4:56
8 Sonata in C Minor, K. 11. Molto moderato  2:36
9 Sonata in C Minor, K. 22. Allegro  2:28

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(1756-1791)

10 fantasia in C Minor, KV 36. Adagio  8:25
(Completed by Maximilian Stadler)

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)

Bunte Blätter, Op. 99
11 N° 10. Prelude. Energish. Three Little Pieces  1:09
12 N° 1. Nicht schnell, mit Innigkeit  2:09
13 N° 2. Sehr rasch  0:51
14 N° 3. Frisch  0:45
15 N° 4. Ziemlich langsam  1:55
16 N° 5. Schnell  0:48
17 N° 6. Ziemlich langsam, sehr gesangvoll  1:45
18 N° 7. Sehr langsam  2:18
19 N° 8. Langsam  1:40
20 N° 13. Scherzo. Lebhaft  3:30

Johannes Brahms
(1833-1897)

21 Variations on a Theme by Robert Schumann in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 9  16:11

Waltzes, Op. 39
22 N° 1 in B Major  0:57
23 N° 3 in G-Sharp Minor  0:39
24 N° 7 in C-Sharp Minor  2:44
25 N° 16 in C-Sharp Minor  0:31
26 N° 6 in C-Sharp Major  1:02
27 N° 15 in A-Flat Major  3:06

*

Maria Grinberg - p

Recorded in Moscow ; 1967 [# 1-10] ; 1947 [# 11-20] ; 1951 [# 21] ; & 1964 [# 22-27]

Joe Pass & Paulinho Da Costa - Tudo Bem !

After countless solo guitar albums for Pablo, Joe Pass performed this welcome change of pace, a set of Brazilian tunes. Joined by fellow guitarist Oscar Castro Neves, bassist Octavio Bailly, drummer Claudio Slon, percussionist Paulinho da Costa and keyboardist Don Grusin, Pass plays warm solos on a variety of Brazilian tunes. Highlights include three songs by Antonio Carlos Jobim (including "Corcovado" and "Wave"), Deodato's "Tears," and Luiz Bonfa's "The Gentle Rain." A melodic and infectious date that has been reissued on CD.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/tudo-bem-r145225

Joe Pass
Paulinho Da Costa
Tudo Bem !

Tracks

1 Corcovado (DeMoraes, Jobim)  6:20
2 Tears (Razao de Viver) (Deodato)  3:32
3 Wave (Jobim)  10:08
4 Voce (You) (Boscoli, Menescal)  3:10
5 If You Went Away (Valle)  3:04
6 Que Que Ha ? (Bailly, Grusin)  6:50
7 The Gentle Rain (Chuva Delicada) (Bonfa, Dubey)  4:11
8 Barquinho (Boscoli, Menescal)  6:11
9 Luciana (DeMoraes, Jobim, Lees)  4:55
10 I Live to Love (Castro-Neves, Fiorini, Gilbert)  3:20

*

Personnel
Joe Pass - g
Paulinho Da Costa - perc
Oscar Castro-Neves - g
Don Grusin - kbrds
Octavio Bailly - b
Claudio Slon - dr

Recorded in Hollywood, California ; May 8, 1978

The European All Stars (Berlin, 1961)

An incredible document of the growth of the European jazz scene in the postwar years — a set recorded in Berlin, but featuring a host of the best players from all over the continent ! The mix of musicians here is wonderful — similar to some of the great boder-crossing experiments from Saba/MPS a few years later — but still wonderfully fresh in this setting – as modern jazz giants from the other side of the Atlantic come together with amazing clarity of sound — and a host of fresh ideas that really set them apart from their contemporaries in the US ! The set features a driving take on "Haitian Fight Song" with Duško Gojković on trumpet, Albert Mangelsdorff on trombone, Arne Domnerus on alto, Hans Koller on tenor, and both Martial Solal and Tete Montoliu on piano. Other numbers include a version of "Am I Blue" with vocals by Monica Zetterlund, "Blue Monk" by a Montoliu trio, "Hittin The Blues" with vibes by Fats Sadi and guitar from Franco Cerri, "Gone With The Wind" with Arne Domernus on alto and Ronnie Ross on baritone, "3 + 3" with Domerus and Ross — plus Koller on tenor and Cerri on guitar, and "Avertissez-Moi" by a larger group with Martial Solal on piano, Koller on tenor, Domnerus on alto, Gojković on trumpet, and Sadi on vibes !
© 1996-2014Dusty Groove, Inc.

Source :  https://www.dustygroove.com/item/602177

Martial Solal
The European All Stars
1961

Tracks

1 Haitian Fight Song (Mingus)  3:46
2 Gone With the Wind (Magidson, Wrubel)  6:31
3 Hittin' the Blues (Sadi)  6:11
4 Blue Monk (Monk)  5:35
5 Avertissez-moi (Solal)  2:51
6 Am I Blue ? (Akst, Clarke)  3:24
7 That Ole Devil Called Love (Fisher, Roberts)  5:04
8 3 + 3 (Boland)  6:39
9 High Notes (Boland)  4:04

*

Personnel
Duško Gojković - tp [# 1, 5-7 & 9]
Maffy Falay - tp [# 1, 5-7 & 9]
Albert Mangelsdorff - tb [# 1, 5-7 & 9]
Arne Domnerus - as [# 1, 2 & 5-9]
Hans Koller - ts [# 1 & 5-9]
Ronnie Ross - bs [# 1, 2 & 5-9]
Fats Sadi - vb [# 1, 3 & 5-9]
Tete Montoliu - p [# 1, 3 & 4-9]
Martial Solal - p [# 1, 5-7 & 9]
Franco Cerri - g [# 1, 2, 3 & 5-9]
Erik Amundsen - b
William Schiöpffe - dr
Monica Zetterlund - vcl [# 6]


Recorded at the Berliner Kongresshalle, Germany ; May 21 1961

Chico Hamilton Gongs East

The best-known of all the 1950s Chico Hamilton Quintet sets, this is also the only early Hamilton music that has been fully reissued on CD. At the time, the drummer's group also included cellist Nate Gershman, guitarist Dennis Budimir, bassist Wyatt Ruther and the young Eric Dolphy on alto, bass clarinet and flute. Dolphy has quite a few short solos on this rewarding music, and the highlights of the date include "Beyond the Blue Horizon," "Passion Flower," Gerald Wilson's "Tuesday at Two" and the exotic "Gongs East." Recommended.
Scott Yanow

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/album/gongs-east-r140054

Chico Hamilton
Gongs East !

Tracks

1 Beyond the Blue Horizon (Harling, Robin, Whiting)  3:06
2 Where I Live (Wilson)  4:02
3 Gongs East (Hamilton)  4:50
4 I Gave My Love a Cherry (Smith)  4:39
5 Good Grief, Dennis (Smith)  3:05
6 Long Ago (And Far Away) (Gershwin, Kern)  3:01
7 Tuesday at Two (Wilson)  5:59
8 Nature by Emerson (Katz)  5:06
9 Far East (Pierce)  4:04
10 Passion Flower (Strayhorn)  3:19

*

Personnel
Eric Dolphy - as, f, bcl & Bb cl
Dennis Budimir - g
Nathan Gershman - ce
Wyatt Ruther - b
Chico Hamilton - dr


Recorded at Radio Recorders, Hollywood, California ; 29 & 30 December 1958

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Eileen Joyce - Great Archive Series, vol. 40

Eileen Joyce’s mother was Spanish and her father, an itinerant labourer and mining prospector, was Irish. Eileen was born into relative poverty, in a tent, in the mining town of Zeehan, Tasmania and brought up near Boulder City in Western Australia. Educated at St Joseph’s Convent, her first instruction at the piano came from her mother. In 1926 Percy Grainger heard the fourteen-year-old Eileen, calling her ‘the most transcendentally gifted child’ he had heard. Wilhelm Backhaus also heard her and recommended that she study in Leipzig. A fund was set up to support her travel and tuition in Germany, and she studied there with Max Pauer and Robert Teichmuller. Pauer gave her the Étude in A-Flat Op. 1, n° 2 by Paul de Schlözer to study, and when the André family, with whom she was staying in Leipzig, suggested she study the basics of piano playing with Teichmuller, she played this piece for him. Teichmuller provided Joyce with all the ground-work for a strong technique but never charged her for his guidance. She also was exposed to and learnt unusual repertoire such as Reger’s Piano Concerto and the Burleske by Richard Strauss.
After three years in Leipzig, Joyce travelled to London with a letter of introduction to conductor Albert Coates from Teichmuller in which he wrote, ‘Eileen has a rare piano talent of special originality and high intelligence. She plays the really difficult Concerto of Prokofiev quite wonderfully.’ Joyce knocked on Coates’s door, and they played through Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto n° 3 in C major, Op. 26 together.
In London Joyce had further periods of instruction from Adelina de Lara and Tobias Matthay, and in Berlin attended master-classes by Artur Schnabel at which she studied Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’ Concerto. Coates suggested she contact Henry Wood, the result being that Joyce made her London and Proms debut at the Queen’s Hall on 6 September 1930. She chose to play Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto n° 3, Op. 26, and Wood invited her to return for consecutive years when she played Beethoven’s Piano Concerto n° 2 in B-Flat, Op. 19, Busoni’s Indianische Fantasie for piano and orchestra, and Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto n° 1, Op. 35. Four years after her debut she took part at the last night of the fortieth season of Proms, again playing Busoni’s Indianische Fantasie. ‘Miss Eileen Joyce played the solo part prettily, if not with any deep understanding of its intellectual qualities, and won much applause.’
From that auspicious beginning, Joyce had a long and successful career as soloist and concerto performer, having at least seventy concertos in her repertoire including those by John Ireland and Rimsky-Korsakov, both concertos by Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky’s Concertos n° 1 and 2, and Busoni’s Indianische Fantasie; but it was her playing of the popular concertos by Grieg, Rachmaninov and Tchaikovsky that endeared her to the British public to whom she was a household name like Benno Moiseiwitsch and Mark Hambourg. Joyce toured extensively, playing in such diverse places as Brazil and Helsinki, and also played with the Berlin Philharmonic under Sergiu Celibidache, as well as with conductors of the stature of Eugene Ormandy and Victor de Sabata, whom she described as ‘wonderful’ when they performed Beethoven’s Piano Concerto n° 4 in G major, Op. 58 together...

Source : https://www.naxos.com/person/Eileen_Joyce/12585.htm

Eileen Joyce
Great Archive Series, vol. 40

Tracks

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
(1756-1791)

1 Allemande & Courante (from Suite in the Style of Handel, KV 399)  4:07
2 Gigue in G major, KV 574  1:29
3 Menuet in D major, KV 355  2:12

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

4 Bagatelle in C major, Op. 33, n° 2  3:11

Franz Liszt
(1811-1886)

5 La Leggierezza (from 3 Etudes de Concert, S.144, n° 2)  4:13

2 Konzertetuden, S 145
6 N° 1 in A-Flat Major. Vivace 'Waldesrauschen'  4:13
7 N° 2 in A Major-C-Sharp Minor. Presto scherzando 'Gnomenreigen'  2:37

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

8 Ballade n° 1 in G minor, Op. 23  9:28
9 Ballade n° 3 in A-Flat Major, Op. 47  7:29
10 Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 66  4:37

Edvard Grieg
(1843-1907)

11 Butterfly (from Lyric Pieces, book III, Op. 43, n° 1)  1:42
12 Melody (from Lyric Pieces, book IV, Op. 47, n° 3)  2:44
13 Solitary Traveller (from Lyric Pieces, book III, Op. 42, n° 2)  2:19
14 Brooklet (from Lyric Pieces, book VII, Op. 62, n° 4)  1:32

Claude Debussy
(1862-1918)

15 Toccata (from Pour le piano, L. 93, n° 3)  3:56

Maurice Ravel
(1875-1937)

16 Jeux d'eau  4:26

Serge Rachmaninov
(1873-1943)

17 10 Preludes, Op. 23 - N° 8 in A-Flat Major (Allegro vivace)  2:54
18 13 Preludes, Op. 32 - N° 8 in A minor (Vivo)  1:34
19 10 Preludes, Op. 23 - N° 5 in G minor (Alla marcia)  3:4

*

Eileen Joyce - p

Recorded between June 8, 1933 & July 8, 1942

See the complete artwork
see also
http://www.callaway.uwa.edu.au/collections/eileen-joyce/timeline

Chico Hamilton Introducing Freddie Gambrell

Freddie Gambrell could be described as an alternative to Cecil Taylor in terms of extending the legacy of Art Tatum into postmodernism, the majority of his peers choosing to cut and run as if a reader confronted with the first half of this sentence. So much more alluring would be the combination of mysterious and mundane details out of which came his relatively brief time in the spotlight, at least by jazz standards. Blinded as a teenager, Gambrell mastered enough instruments to humiliate even a multi-instrumentalist from Chicago's Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians. He learned violin at 11, later recorded on viola, was "introduced" to the public in the early '50s by maestro Chico Hamilton as a pianist in the "blind genius" category, and also played guitar, bass, and brass instruments from top to bottom. One of the strangest things about Gambrell — which at the very least gives him something in common with Garth Brooks and the suicidal phase of Phil Ochs — was his reinvention of himself as Federico Cervantes, modern jazz trumpet player. The discography of Gambrell, such as it is, cannot really be examined without a study of as many as four albums released under the name of the Federico Cervantes Sextet. Reports about these recordings are enthusiastic, mentioning combinations of Latin jazz and country & western and trumpet solos full of the type of daring common to a musician operating under an alias. His approach as Cervantes nonetheless came out of his self-taught background as Gambrell, at one point paying his way by playing keyboards in clubs much more off the beaten track than the San Francisco Jazz Workshop. The latter venue finally provided Gambrell an opportunity to present his keyboard style to a wider, more discerning audience. He was associated with a rhythm section featuring Hamilton and Ben Tucker, a bassist from Nashville. This artist's stylistic choices under whatever name are bound by their connection to the Bay area, the sweet smell of old vinyl in glossy covers on the World Pacific label perhaps as exciting as the music itself, in parts crystallizing the pianist's Tatum update while jazzing up the score from The Mikado. Critics were of a divided opinion and an alternative viewpoint was available directly from the horse's mouth at The Sticky Wicket, a venue in Santa Cruz where Gambrell began doing a singer/songwriter gig, backing himself on guitar and also opening for himself as a jazz lecturer. Virtuosity is obviously a great attraction for Gambrell. As Cervantes, he went for the trumpet style of players such as Maynard Ferguson, complete with high-note acrobatics. His emphasis on Tatum, like a violinist choosing Paganini, meant that his keyboard performances were insistently brilliant technically — although this did not always distract club patrons from watching the seeing-eye dog sitting at Gambrell's feet.
Eugene Chadbourne

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:h9fwxq95ldse~T1

Chico Hamilton
Trio
Introducing
Freddie Gambrell

Tracks

1 Lullaby of the Leaves (Petkere, Young)  5:41
2 Recreation Blues (Gambrell)  4:55
3 These Foolish Things (Link, Marvell, Strachey)  4:08
4 Ex-Ray's Friends (Gambrell)  4:10
5 In the Still of the Night (Porter)  3:51
6 You're the Cream in My Coffee (Brown, DeSylva, Henderson)  4:20
7 Midnight Sun (Burke, Hampton, Mercer)  4:42
8 Five Minutes More (Cahn, Styne)  3:10
9 Sea Waves (unknown)  2:38
10 A Foggy Day (Gershwin, Gershwin)  2:57
11 Devil's Demise (unknown)  5:39

*

Personnel
Freddie Gambrell - p
Ben Tucker - b
Chico Hamilton - dr & voc [# 10 only]

Recorded March 24 & 25, 1958

Don Fagerquist Octet

Trumpeter/arranger Fagerquist defines the typical West Coast cool sound, and his band plays every nuance, phrase, and measure in hushed tones as a reserved, attractive, easily likable pure jazz persona. The band features such notables as alto saxophonist Herb Geller, valve trombonist Bob Enevoldsen, pianist/arranger Marty Paich, and drummer Mel Lewis. Lesser knowns such as second trumpeter Ed Leddy, baritone saxophonist Ronnie Lang, bassist Buddy Clark, and French horn player Vince DeRosa prove their mettle amongst the tall California redwood big names. The octet plays eight reworked standards, some like "Easy to Love" much cooler than the others, and "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" a fine, full, and mellow ballad, both trumpet led. Though typical of '50s cool, "Aren't You Glad You're You?" has a hopping "Would You Like to Swing on a Star"-type melody, trumpet and trombone upfront, piano setting up the horns who throw this melody down, while the easy swinger "All the Things You Are" is somewhat predictable but rich in harmonic content. It's clear this is Fagerquist's session and he deals the melodic cards on "The Song Is You," the others playing a second line, then the whole section counterpoints the third. They're all over the place, bouncing here and there during "Time After Time," and DeRosa leads into trumpet on "Easy Living," followed by a tip-toe traipsing bridge chart for all. The most challenging arrangement crops up on "Lullaby of Birdland." The first half of the melody is cleanly stated, the other half broken up and reassembled several times over, a good swinger as Geller's alto gets the spotlight in a Bird-like solo with more counterpoint and Enevoldsen's trombone trading lines with Geller. This is a sleeper, one that doesn't jump out and grab you graphically, and the names are innocent, most notably Fagerquist's. Still it's a session that should not be ignored as one of the hallmarks of Pacific jazz expressionism in those feel-good times and a pivot point in jazz recordings of glorious 1957. Highly recommended.
Michael G. Nastos

Source : http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hvfexqrgld6e

Don Fagerquist
Eight by Eight
(Music to Fill a Void)

Tracks

1 Aren't You Glad You're You (Burke, VanHeusen)  5:14
2 Easy to Love (Porter)  4:41
3 Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Harbach, Kern)  3:33
4 All the Things You Are (Hammerstein, Kern)  3:32
5 The Song Is You (Hammerstein, Kern)  3:55
6 Time After Time (Cahn, Styne)  4:20
7 Easy Living (Rainger, Robin)  4:12
8 Lullaby of Broadway (Dubin, Warren)  4:13

*

Personnel
Don Fagerquist - tp
Herb Geller - as
Ronnie Lang - bs
Ed Leddy - tp
Bob Enevoldsen - tb
Vince DeRosa - frhrn
Marty Paich - p
Buddy Clark - b
Mel Lewis - dr

Recorded at Radio Recorders, Hollywood, California ; September 14, 1957

Ania Dorfmann - The Complete RCA Album Collection

Ania Dorfmann was one of the Juilliard School’s most venerated piano teachers. Her considerable accomplishments as a recording artist, however, are finally receiving their due with a 9-CD original-jacket albums collection encompassing her complete recordings for RCA Victor.
With this release, the vast majority of Dorfmann’s RCA recordings are reissued on 8 compact discs for the first time, transferred, mixed and mastered from the original analogue master discs and tapes, using 24 bit / 192 kHz technology. These include long sought-after rarities such as her rare 1939 rendition of the Choral Fantasy with Arturo Toscanini, Beethoven’s “Moonlight” and “Pathétique” Sonatas, concertos by Grieg and Mendelssohn, works of Schumann, Chopin and Tchaikovsky, and one of the first complete editions of Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words. Apparently Dorfmann was the first female piano soloist to collaborate with Arturo Toscanini, and their historic 1945 studio recording of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto n° 1 marked the start of the of the pianist’s relationship with RCA.
Born in Odessa, Russia on July 9, 1899, Ania Dorfmann gave her first concert at age 11, and also accompanied a younger fellow child prodigy, violinist Jascha Heifetz. In 1916/7 Dorfmann studied in Paris with Isidor Philipp at the Conservatoire. Later she based herself in London. Her New York debut took place at Town Hall in 1936. After settling in New York two years later, Dorfmann was invited by Arturo Toscanini in 1939 to perform Beethoven’s Choral Fantasy with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, the only occasion on which he performed this work. In addition to her concert tours, Dorfmann also worked in Hollywood, where her pre-recorded playing is mimed on screen by Barbara Stanwyck in the 1947 film The Other Love. In the 1950s Dorfmann joined the Juilliard School of Music Faculty, where she maintained a busy teaching career until her retirement in June 1983. Dorfmann passed away at her Manhattan apartment on April 21, 1984.

Source : https://shop.abc.net.au/products/the-complete-rca-album-collection-9cd

Ania Dorfmann
The Complete RCA Album Collection

Tracks

Cd. 1

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Piano Concerto n° 1 in C Major, Op. 15
1 I. Allegro con brio  14:15
2 II. Largo  9:34
3 III. Rondo. Allegro scherzando  8:06

Fantasia for Piano, Chorus, and Orchestra "Choral Fantasy", Op. 80
4 Adagio  2:56
5 Finale. Allegro  3:58
6 Allegro molto  1:46
7 Adagio, ma non troppo  1:56
8 Marcia, assai vivace - Allegro  1:59
9 Allegretto, ma non troppo (quasi Andante con moto)  3:38
"Schmeichelnd hold und lieblich klingen" - Presto

Franz Liszt
(1811-1886)

10 Études de concert, S.144. N° 3. Un Sospiro  5:16

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)
Fantasiestücke, Op. 12
11 N° 2. Aufschwung. Sehr rasch  3:15
12 N° 3. Warum ? Langsam und zart  2:39
13 N° 4. Grillen. Mit Humor  2:15
14 N° 7. Traumes Wirren. Äußert lebhaft  2:39

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

15 6 Ecossaises for Piano, WoO 83  2:12

Felix Mendelssohn
(1809-1847)

16 Rondo Capriccioso in E Major, Op. 14  6:00
Andante - Presto

*

Ania Dorfmann - p
Westminster Choir [# 4-9]
NBC Symphony Orchestra/Arturo Toscanini - dir. [1-9]

Recorded at Carnegie Hall, New York City ; August 9, 1945 [#1-3] ; December 2, 1939 [# 4-9] ; RCA Victor Studios n° 2, New York City ; January 17, 1947 [# 10 & 11] ; RCA Victor Studios n° 2 & 6, New York City ; November 26, 1947 [# 12-16]

*

Cd. 2

Ludwig van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Piano Sonata n° 14 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 27, n° 2 "Moonlight"
1 I. Adagio sostenuto - attacca  7:21
2 II. Allegretto - Trio - attacca  2:15
3 III. Presto agitato  7:15

Piano Sonata n° 8 in C Minor, Op. 13 "Pathétique"
4 I. Grave - Allegro di molto e con brio  10:18
5 II. Adagio cantabile  6:09
6 III. Rondo. Allegro  4:13

Recorded at Town Hall, New York City ; July 22, [# 1-3] & June 23 [# 4-6], 1952

*

Cd. 3

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

1 Waltz n° 1 in E-Flat Major "Grande valse brillante", Op. 18. Vivo  4:55
2 Waltz n° 9 in A-Flat Major "L'Adieu", Op. posth. 69, n° 1. Lento  4:35
3 Waltz n° 6 in D-Flat Major "Minute Waltz", Op. 64, n° 1. Molto vivace  1:46
4 Waltz n° 8 in A-Flat Major, Op. 64, n° 3. Moderato  2:51
5 Waltz n° 11 in F-Flat Major, Op. 70, n° 1. Molto vivace  1:58
6 Waltz n° 12 in F Minor, Op. 70, n° 2. Tempo guisto  2:40
7 Waltz n° 5 in A-Flat Major "Grand valse", Op. 42  3:45
8 Waltz n° 10 in B Minor, Op. posth. 69, n° 2. Moderato  3:21
9 Waltz n° 4 in F Major "Grande valse brillante", Op. 34, n° 3. Vivace  2:04
10 Waltz n° 3 in A Minor "Grande valse brillante" Op. 34, n° 2. Lento  4:56
11 Waltz n° 2 in A-Flat Major "Grande valse brillante", Op. 64, n° 2. Vivace  4:37
12 Waltz n° 7 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 64, n° 2. Tempo giusto  3:07
13 Waltz n° 13 in D-Flat Major, Op. 70, n° 3. Moderato  2:33
14 Waltz n° 14 in E Minor, Op. posth. Vivace  2:35

Recorded at Town Hall, New York City ; February 26, [# 1, 3, 7 & 11] ; April 21 [# 2, 5, 6, 8, 10 & 12] ; & May 13 [# 4, 9, 13 & 14], 1953

*

Cd. 4

Edvard Grieg
(1843-1907)

Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 16
1 I. Allegro molto moderato  11:55
2 II. Adagio - attacca  5:54
3 III. Allegro moderato molto e marcato - Quasi Presto -  9:49
Andante maestoso

Felix Mendelssohn
(1809-1847)

Piano Concerto n° 1 in G Minor, Op. 25
4 I. Molto allegro con fuoco  7:19
5 II. Andante  5:26
6 III. Presto - Molto Allegro e vivace  6:17

*

Ania Dorfmann - p
The Robin Hood Dell Orchestra Of Philadelphia/Erich Leinsdorf

Recorded at Academy of Music, Philadelphia ; July 8, [# 1-3] ; & July 7 [# 4-6], 1953

*

Cd. 5

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)

1 Papillons, Op. 2 11:46
Introduzione. Moderato - N° 1 - N° 2. Prestissimo -
N° 3 - N° 4. Presto - N° 5 - N° 6 - N 7. Semplice -
N° 8 - N° 9. Prestissimo - N° 10. Vivo - N° 11 - ° 12. Finale

Felix Mendelssohn
(1809-1847)

2 Andante and Rondo Capriccioso in E Major, Op. 14  6:41
3 Lied one Worte (Book 5), Op. 62, n° 1. Andante espressivo in G major "May Breezes"  3:18
4 Lied one Worte (Book 6), Op. 67, n° 4. Presto in C Major “Spinner’s Song”  1:46

Frédéric Chopin
(1810-1849)

3 Ecossaises, Op. 72, n° 3
5 N° 1 in D Major. Vivace  0:47
6 N° 2 in G Major  0:38
7 N° 3 in D-Flat Maor  0:35

Franz Liszt
(1811-1886)

8 Un Sospiro (from 3 Études de concert), S.144, n° 3  5:32

Maurice Ravel
(1875-1937)

Sonatine
9 I. Modéré  3:57
10 II. Mouvement de Menuet  2:28
11 III. Animé  3:45

Gian Carlo Menotti
(1911-2007)

12 Ricercare and Toccata on a Theme from "The Old Maid and the Thief"  6:18
(dedicated to Ania Dorfmann)

Recorded at Town Hall, New York City ; January 3, 1952 [# 1, 5, 7, 9-12] ; & January 12 & 13, 1953 [# 2-4 & 8]

*

Cd. 6

Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky
(1840-1893)

Album for the Young, Op. 39
1 N° 1. Morning Prayer  1:12
2 N° 2. Winter Morning  1:17
3 N° 3. Playing Hobby-Horses  0:35
4 N° 4. Mama  1:06
5 N° 5. March of the Wooden Soldiers  0:52
6 N° 6. The Sick Doll  1:35
7 N° 7. The Doll's Funeral  1:56
8 N° 8. Waltz  1:06
9 N° 9. The New Doll  0:29
10 N° 10. Mazurka  0:50
11 N° 11. Russian Song  0:36
12 N° 12. The Peasant Plays the Accordion  0:29
13 N° 13. Kamarinskaya  0:28
14 N° 14. Polka  0:40
15 N° 15. Italian Song  0:45
16 N° 16. Old French Song  0:50
17 N° 17. German Song  0:51
18 N° 18. Neapolitan Song  1:01
19 N° 19. The Nurse's Tale  0:41
20 N° 20. The Witch  0:38
21 N° 21. Sweet Deams  1:38
22 N° 22. Song of the Lark  0:44
23 N° 23. The Hurdy-Gurdy Man  0:47
24 N° 24. In Church  3:15

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)

Klavieralbum für die Jugend, Op. 68
25 N° 2. Soldatenmarsch  0:33
26 N° 6. Armes Waisenkind  1:46
27 N° 7. Jägerliedchen  1:01
28 N° 8. Wilder Reiter  0:32
29 N° 10. Fröhlicher Landmann  0:43
30 N° 12 Knecht Ruprecht  1:43
31 N° 16. Erster Verlust  1:13

Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky
(1840-1893)

The Seasons, Op. 37a
32 N° 2. February. Carnival  2:44
33 N° 3. March. Song of the Lark  1:54
34 N° 4. April. Snowdrops  2:49
35 N° 6. June. Barcarolle  4:38
36 N° 8. August. Harvest Song  3:22
37 N° 10. October. Song of Autumn  3:33
38 N° 11. November. In a Troika  2:49
39 N° 12. December. Christmas  3:32

Recorded at Town Hall, New York City ; April 12 [# 1-24] & June 8 [# 25-39], 1954

*

Cd. 7

Felix Mendelssohn
(1809-1847)

Lieder ohne Worte

Book 1, Op. 19b
1 N° 1 in E major. Andante con moto  4:08
2 N° 2 in A minor. Andante espressivo  2:36
3 N° 3 in A major. Molto allegro e vivace  2:22
"Jägerlied"
4 N° 4 in A major. Moderato  2:06
5 N° 5 in F-Sharp minor. Agitato  2:58
6 N° 6 in G minor. Andante sostenuto  2:27
"Venezianisches Gondellied"

Book 2, Op. 30
7 N° 1 in E-Flat major. Andante espressivo  5:08
8 N° 2 in B-Flat minor. Allegro di molto  2:03
9 N° 3 in E major. Adagio non troppo  2:23
10 N° 4 in B minor. Agitato e con fuoco  2:51
11 N° 5 in D major. Andante grazioso  1:58
12 N° 6 in F-Sharp minor. Allegretto tranquillo  3:15
"Venezianisches Gondellied"

Book 3, Op. 38
13 N° 1 in E-Flat major. Con moto  2:18
14 N° 2 in C minor. Allegro non troppo  2:22
15 N° 3 in E major. Presto e molto vivace  2:13
16 N° 4 in A major. Andante  2:32
17 N° 5 in A minor. Agitato  2:18
18 N° 6 in A-Flat major. Andante con moto  2:47
"Duetto"

Book 4, Op. 53
19 N° 1 in A-Flat major. Andante con moto  2:55
20 N° 2 in E-Flat major. Allegro non troppo  2:19
21 N° 3 in G minor. Presto agitato  2:25
22 N° 4 in F major. Adagio  3:38
"Abendlied"
23 N° 5 in A minor. Allegro con fuoco  2:51
"Volkslied"
24 N° 6 in A major. Molto allegro vivace  2:40

Recorded a Town Hal, New York City ; [# 1-6] ; dates unknown [# 7-21] : Webster Hall, New York City ; October 12 [# 22 & 23], 14 [# 23 & 24] & 27 # 22-24], 1955 ; November 15, 1955 [# 22]

*

Cd. 8

Felix Mendelssohn
(1809-1847)

Lieder ohne Worte

Book 5, Op. 62
1 N° 1 in G major. Andante espressivo  3:19
"Mailüfte"
2 N° 2 in B-Flat major. Allegro con fuoco  1:56
3 N° 3 in E minor. Andante maestoso  3:11
"Trauermarsch"
4 N° 4 in G major. Allegro con anima   1:29
5 N° 5 in A minor. Andante con moto  2:55
"Venezianisches Gondellied"
6 N° 6 in A major. Allegretto grazioso  2:21
"Frühlingslied"

Book 6, Op. 67
7 N° 1 in E-Flat major. Andante  3:11
8 N° 2 in F-Sharp minor. Allegro leggiero  1:53
9 N° 3 in B-Flat major. Andante tranquillo  3:09
10 N° 4 in C major. Presto  1:47
"Spinnerlied"
11 N° 5 in B minor. Moderato  2:15
12 N° 6 in E major. Allegro e non troppo  2:21

Book 7, Op. 85
13 N° 1 in F major. Andante espressivo  2:53
14 N° 2 in A minor. Allegro agitato  0:51
15 N° 3 in E-Flat major. Presto  1:48
16 N° 4 in D major. Andante sostenuto  2:50
17 N° 5 in A major. Allegretto  2:15
18 N° 6 in B-Flat major. Allegretto con moto  2:12

Book 8, Op. 102
19 N° 1 in E minor. Andante un poco agitato  3:09
20 N° 2 in D major. Adagio  2:08
21 N° 3 in C major. Presto  1:22
22 N° 4 in G minor. Un poco agitato, ma andante  3:12
23 N° 5 in A major. Allegro vivace  1:12
"Kinderstück"
24 N° 6 in C major. Andante  1:58

25 Gondellied in A Minor. Barcarolle. Allegretto, non troppo   1:59

Recorded at Webster Hall, New York City ; October 12 [# 1-3 & 6-8], 14 [# 2, -4, 8, 10 & 12], 1955 ; November 15 [# 12-16, 20-22] & 16 [# 12, 15-18, 23 & 24], 1955 ; & December 22 [# 3, 6, 7, 16, 18 & 25] & 20 [# 15, 18, 19 & 23-25], 1955

*

Cd. 9

Robert Schumann
(1810-1856)

Carnaval, Op. 9
Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes
1 Préambule. Quasi maestoso - Più moto - Animato - Vivo - Presto  2:32
2 Pierrot. Moderato  1:08
3 Arlequin. Vivo  1:08
4 Valse noble. Un poco maestoso  1:21
5 Eusebius. Adagio  1:45
6 Florestan. Passionato  0:53
7 Coquette. Vivo  1:07
8 Répliques. L'istesso tempo - (Sphinxes, n° 1-3)  0:49
9 Papillons. Prestissimo  0:46
10 A.S.C.H. - S.C.H.A (Lettres dansantes). Presto  0:44
11 Chiarina. Passionato  1:02
12 Chopin. Agitato  1:44
13 Estrella. Con affetto  0:25
14 Reconnaissance. Animato  1:37
15 Pantalon et Colombine. Presto  1:01
16 Valse allemande. Molto vivace  0:53
17 Paganini. Intermezzo. Presto  1:23
18 Aveu. Passionato  1:04
19 Promenade. Comodo  2:01
20 Pause. Vivo  0:20
21 Marche des "Davidsbündler" contre les Philistins.
Non allegro - Molto più vivo - Animato - Vivo - Animato molto -Vivo - Più Stretto  3:56

Fantasiestücke, Op. 12
22 N° 1. Des Abends. Sehr innig zu spielen  5:13
23 N° 2. Aufschwung. Sehr rasch  3:11
24 N° 3. Warum ? Langsam und Zart  3:12
25 N° 4. Grillen. Mit Humor  3:12
26 N° 5. In der Nacht. Mit Leidenschaft  3:56
27 N° 6. Fabel. Lagsam - Schnell  2:35
28 N° 7. Traumes Wirren. Äußert lebhaft  2:32
29 N° 8. Ende vom Lied. Mit gutem Humor  4:29

*

Ania Dorfmann - p

Recorded at Town Hall, New York City ; September 18, 28 & 29 ; & October 1-3 & 8, 1958 ; & September 14, 1959 [# 1-21] ; September 29 & October 8 & 9, 1958 [# 22-29]